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The Beehive and The Anchor

By WB Daniel Genchi

 

The beehive and the anchor are two symbols that are commonly associated with Freemasonry, a fraternity that traces its origins back to the local fraternities of stonemasons in the Middle Ages. These symbols have a rich history and are imbued with deep meaning, both in terms of their historical origins and their biblical associations.


The beehive is a symbol of industry, cooperation, and teamwork. In the context of Freemasonry, it serves as a reminder of the importance of working together and supporting one another in order to achieve a common goal. The beehive also has a long history as a symbol of industry and hard work, dating back to ancient civilizations such as the Egyptians and the Greeks. In the Bible, the beehive is mentioned as a symbol of diligence and hard work in the book of Proverbs: "Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise: Which having no guide, overseer, or ruler, Provideth her meat in the summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest" (Proverbs 6:6-8).


The anchor, on the other hand, is a symbol of hope and stability. In Freemasonry, it is often associated with the idea of a "moral anchor" that helps to guide one's actions and keep them on the right path. The anchor also has a long history as a symbol of hope and stability, dating back to ancient civilizations such as the Romans and the Greeks. In the Bible, the anchor is used as a symbol of hope and steadfastness in times of trial and adversity, as seen in Hebrews 6:19: "Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil".


Both the beehive and the anchor are important symbols in Freemasonry, and they represent important values and ideals that are central to the fraternity. They are reminders of the importance of hard work, cooperation, hope, and stability, and they have deep historical and biblical roots. Whether used as a decorative element in Masonic regalia or as a reminder of the values that Freemasons hold dear, these symbols continue to hold a special place in the fraternity and are a testament to its rich history and traditions.

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